Cover Story Current Issue

The year 2021 marks the 100th year of the discovery of insulin, one of the most important discoveries in the history of medical science—in terms of its lasting impact on hundreds of millions of people worldwide and in the development of medical science. This special issue of Molecular Metabolism takes us through the journey over this remarkable century and highlights several aspects of this discovery and its impact – both in diabetes and medical science – in a much broader way.

C. Ronald Kahn

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Current Issue

Insulin action at a molecular level – 100 years of progress

Morris F. White, C. Ronald Kahn

The discovery of insulin 100 years ago and its application to the treatment of human disease in the years since have marked a major turning point in the history of medicine. The availability of purified insulin allowed for the establishment of its physiological role in the regulation of blood glucose and ketones, the determination of its amino acid sequence, and the solving of its structure. Over the last 50 years, the function of insulin has been applied into the discovery of the insulin receptor and its signaling cascade to reveal the role of impaired insulin signaling—or resistance—in the progression of type 2 diabetes. It has also become clear that insulin signaling can impact not only classical insulin-sensitive tissues, but all tissues of the body, and that in many of these tissues the insulin signaling cascade regulates unexpected physiological functions. Despite these remarkable advances, much remains to be learned about both insulin signaling and how to use this molecular knowledge to advance the treatment of type 2 diabetes and other insulin-resistant states.

 

Insulin action at a molecular level – 100 years of progress

Morris F. White, C. Ronald Kahn

The discovery of insulin 100 years ago and its application to the treatment of human disease in the years since have marked a major turning point in the history of medicine. The availability of purified insulin allowed for the establishment of its physiological role in the regulation of blood glucose and ketones, the determination of its amino acid sequence, and the solving of its structure. Over the last 50 years, the function of insulin has been applied into the discovery of the insulin receptor and its signaling cascade to reveal the role of impaired insulin signaling—or resistance—in the progression of type 2 diabetes. It has also become clear that insulin signaling can impact not only classical insulin-sensitive tissues, but all tissues of the body, and that in many of these tissues the insulin signaling cascade regulates unexpected physiological functions. Despite these remarkable advances, much remains to be learned about both insulin signaling and how to use this molecular knowledge to advance the treatment of type 2 diabetes and other insulin-resistant states.

 

2020 impact factor: 7.4

The 60 Second Metabolist

In this section authors briefly report on their work recently published in Molecular Metabolism.

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