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White adipose tissue (WAT) is a complex organ that plays a central role in systemic energy balance through its interrelated metabolic, endocrine, and immune functions. Adipocytes, the parenchymal cells of adipose tissue, have diverse functions that include storage and mobilization of lipids. They also release endocrine signals that report energy status to the brain, regulating metabolic functions in peripheral organs. Importantly, the metabolic character of white adipocytes is flexible, with cells capable of assuming distinct anabolic and catabolic/thermogenic phenotypes, often within the same adipose tissue depot

Elizabeth A. Rondini, Vanesa D. Ramseyer, Rayanne B. Burl, Roger Pique-Regi, James G. Granneman

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Endothelial BBSome is essential for vascular, metabolic, and retinal functions

Jingwei Jiang, John J. Reho, Sajag Bhattarai, Ioana Cherascu, ... Kamal Rahmouni

Objectives

Endothelial cells that line the entire vascular system play a pivotal role in the control of various physiological processes, including metabolism. Additionally, endothelial dysfunction is associated with many pathological conditions, including obesity. Here, we assessed the role of the BBSome, a protein complex composed of eight Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) proteins in endothelial cells.

Methods

We studied the effects of BBSome disruption in endothelial cells on vascular function, body weight, glucose homeostasis, and the liver and retina. For this, we generated mice with selective BBSome disruption in endothelial cells through Bbs1gene deletion.

Results

We found that endothelial cell–specific BBSome disruption causes endothelial dysfunction, as indicated by the impaired acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation in both the aorta and mesenteric artery. This was associated with an increase in the contractile response to thromboxane A2 receptor agonist (U46619) in the mesenteric artery. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that mice lacking the Bbs1 gene in endothelial cells show elevated vascular angiotensinogen gene expression, implicating renin-angiotensin system activation in the vascular changes evoked by endothelial BBSome deficiency. Strikingly, our data indicate that endothelial BBSome deficiency increases body weight and fat mass and causes hepatosteatosisalong with alterations in hepatic expression of lipid metabolism–related genes and metabolomics profile. In addition, electroretinogram and optical coherence tomography analyses revealed functional and structural abnormalities in the retina, evoked by absence of the endothelial BBSome.

Conclusions

Our findings demonstrate that the BBSome in endothelial cells is required for the regulation of vascular function, adiposity, hepatic lipid metabolism, and retinal function.

Endothelial BBSome is essential for vascular, metabolic, and retinal functions

Jingwei Jiang, John J. Reho, Sajag Bhattarai, Ioana Cherascu, ... Kamal Rahmouni

Objectives

Endothelial cells that line the entire vascular system play a pivotal role in the control of various physiological processes, including metabolism. Additionally, endothelial dysfunction is associated with many pathological conditions, including obesity. Here, we assessed the role of the BBSome, a protein complex composed of eight Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) proteins in endothelial cells.

Methods

We studied the effects of BBSome disruption in endothelial cells on vascular function, body weight, glucose homeostasis, and the liver and retina. For this, we generated mice with selective BBSome disruption in endothelial cells through Bbs1gene deletion.

Results

We found that endothelial cell–specific BBSome disruption causes endothelial dysfunction, as indicated by the impaired acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation in both the aorta and mesenteric artery. This was associated with an increase in the contractile response to thromboxane A2 receptor agonist (U46619) in the mesenteric artery. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that mice lacking the Bbs1 gene in endothelial cells show elevated vascular angiotensinogen gene expression, implicating renin-angiotensin system activation in the vascular changes evoked by endothelial BBSome deficiency. Strikingly, our data indicate that endothelial BBSome deficiency increases body weight and fat mass and causes hepatosteatosisalong with alterations in hepatic expression of lipid metabolism–related genes and metabolomics profile. In addition, electroretinogram and optical coherence tomography analyses revealed functional and structural abnormalities in the retina, evoked by absence of the endothelial BBSome.

Conclusions

Our findings demonstrate that the BBSome in endothelial cells is required for the regulation of vascular function, adiposity, hepatic lipid metabolism, and retinal function.

2020 impact factor: 7.4

The 60 Second Metabolist

In this section authors briefly report on their work recently published in Molecular Metabolism.

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