Cover Story Current Issue

White adipose tissue (WAT) is a complex organ that plays a central role in systemic energy balance through its interrelated metabolic, endocrine, and immune functions. Adipocytes, the parenchymal cells of adipose tissue, have diverse functions that include storage and mobilization of lipids. They also release endocrine signals that report energy status to the brain, regulating metabolic functions in peripheral organs. Importantly, the metabolic character of white adipocytes is flexible, with cells capable of assuming distinct anabolic and catabolic/thermogenic phenotypes, often within the same adipose tissue depot

Elizabeth A. Rondini, Vanesa D. Ramseyer, Rayanne B. Burl, Roger Pique-Regi, James G. Granneman

Full text

 

Current Issue

Hemostatic alterations linked to body fat distribution, fatty liver, and insulin resistance

Sebastian Hörber, Rainer Lehmann, Norbert Stefan, Jürgen Machann, ... Andreas Peter

Objective

Obesity, in particular visceral obesity, and insulin resistance emerged as major risk factors for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is strongly associated with hemostatic alterations. Because obesity and insulin resistance predispose to thrombotic diseases, we investigated the relationship between hemostatic alterations and body fat distribution in participants at risk for type 2 diabetes.

Subjects

Body fat distribution (visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue) and liver fat content of 150 participants – with impaired glucose tolerance and/or impaired fasting glucose – were determined using magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Participants underwent precise metabolic characterization and major hemostasis parameters were analyzed.

Results

Procoagulant factors (FII, FVII, FVIII, and FIX) and anticoagulant proteins(antithrombin, protein C, and protein S) were significantly associated with body fat distribution. In patients with fatty liverfibrinogen (298 mg/dl vs. 264 mg/dl, p = 0.0182), FVII (99% vs. 90%, p = 0.0049), FVIII (114% vs. 90%, p = 0.0098), protein C (124% vs. 111%, p = 0.0006), and protein S (109% vs. 89%, p < 0.0001) were higher than in controls. In contrast, antithrombin (97% vs. 102%, p = 0.0025) was higher in control patients. In multivariate analyses controlling for insulin sensitivity, body fat compartments, and genotype variants (PNPLA3I148MM/MI/TM6SF2E167kK/kE), only protein C and protein S remained significantly increased in fatty liver.

Conclusions

Body fat distribution is significantly associated with alterations of procoagulant and anticoagulant parameters. Liver fat plays a key role in the regulation of protein C and protein S, suggesting a potential counteracting mechanism to the prothrombotic state in subjects with prediabetes and fatty liver.

Hemostatic alterations linked to body fat distribution, fatty liver, and insulin resistance

Sebastian Hörber, Rainer Lehmann, Norbert Stefan, Jürgen Machann, ... Andreas Peter

Objective

Obesity, in particular visceral obesity, and insulin resistance emerged as major risk factors for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is strongly associated with hemostatic alterations. Because obesity and insulin resistance predispose to thrombotic diseases, we investigated the relationship between hemostatic alterations and body fat distribution in participants at risk for type 2 diabetes.

Subjects

Body fat distribution (visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue) and liver fat content of 150 participants – with impaired glucose tolerance and/or impaired fasting glucose – were determined using magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Participants underwent precise metabolic characterization and major hemostasis parameters were analyzed.

Results

Procoagulant factors (FII, FVII, FVIII, and FIX) and anticoagulant proteins(antithrombin, protein C, and protein S) were significantly associated with body fat distribution. In patients with fatty liverfibrinogen (298 mg/dl vs. 264 mg/dl, p = 0.0182), FVII (99% vs. 90%, p = 0.0049), FVIII (114% vs. 90%, p = 0.0098), protein C (124% vs. 111%, p = 0.0006), and protein S (109% vs. 89%, p < 0.0001) were higher than in controls. In contrast, antithrombin (97% vs. 102%, p = 0.0025) was higher in control patients. In multivariate analyses controlling for insulin sensitivity, body fat compartments, and genotype variants (PNPLA3I148MM/MI/TM6SF2E167kK/kE), only protein C and protein S remained significantly increased in fatty liver.

Conclusions

Body fat distribution is significantly associated with alterations of procoagulant and anticoagulant parameters. Liver fat plays a key role in the regulation of protein C and protein S, suggesting a potential counteracting mechanism to the prothrombotic state in subjects with prediabetes and fatty liver.

2020 impact factor: 7.4

The 60 Second Metabolist

In this section authors briefly report on their work recently published in Molecular Metabolism.

Watch the most recent interviews by clicking the video still. 

Here is a video of Vimeo. When the iframes is activated, a connection to Vimeo is established and, if necessary, cookies from Vimeo are also used. For further information on cookies policy click here.

Here is a video of Vimeo. When the iframes is activated, a connection to Vimeo is established and, if necessary, cookies from Vimeo are also used. For further information on cookies policy click here.