Cover Story Current Issue

Alterations in mitochondrial structure and function are commonly observed in adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. In ALS, mitochondrial dysfunction impairs the efficiency of electron transport chain (ETC) activity and ATP production and leads to the accumulation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, abnormal handling of intracellular calcium and cytochrome C release and apoptosis. The extent to which these alterations in mitochondrial functionimpair cellular operations is unclear. Therapeutic intervention based on combating these mitochondrial abnormalities have displayed variable success in mouse models of ALS and humans, as reviewed in Vandoorne et al.

Sean-Patrick Riechers, Jelena Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Tayler B. Belton, Ram P. Chakrabarty, ... Robert G. Kalb

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Current Issue

Ferroptosis and ferritinophagy in diabetes complications

Jiahui He, Zhangwang Li, Panpan Xia, Ao Shi, ... Peng Yu

Background

With long-term metabolic malfunction, diabetes can cause serious damage to whole-body tissue and organs, resulting in a variety of complications. Therefore, it is particularly important to further explore the pathogenesis of diabetes complications and develop drugs for prevention and treatment. In recent years, different from apoptosis and necrosis, ferroptosis has been recognized as a new regulatory mode of cell death and involves the regulation of nuclear receptor coactivator 4 (NCOA4)-mediated ferritinophagy. Evidence shows that ferroptosis and ferritinophagy play a significant role in the occurrence and development of diabetes complications.

Scope of review

we systematically review the current understanding of ferroptosis and ferritinophagy, focusing on their potential mechanisms, connection, and regulation, discuss their involvement in diabetes complications, and consider emerging therapeutic opportunities and the associated challenges with future prospects.

Major conclusions

In summary, ferroptosis and ferritinophagy are worthy targets for the treatment of diabetes complications, but their complete molecular mechanism and pathophysiological process still require further study.

Ferroptosis and ferritinophagy in diabetes complications

Jiahui He, Zhangwang Li, Panpan Xia, Ao Shi, ... Peng Yu

Background

With long-term metabolic malfunction, diabetes can cause serious damage to whole-body tissue and organs, resulting in a variety of complications. Therefore, it is particularly important to further explore the pathogenesis of diabetes complications and develop drugs for prevention and treatment. In recent years, different from apoptosis and necrosis, ferroptosis has been recognized as a new regulatory mode of cell death and involves the regulation of nuclear receptor coactivator 4 (NCOA4)-mediated ferritinophagy. Evidence shows that ferroptosis and ferritinophagy play a significant role in the occurrence and development of diabetes complications.

Scope of review

we systematically review the current understanding of ferroptosis and ferritinophagy, focusing on their potential mechanisms, connection, and regulation, discuss their involvement in diabetes complications, and consider emerging therapeutic opportunities and the associated challenges with future prospects.

Major conclusions

In summary, ferroptosis and ferritinophagy are worthy targets for the treatment of diabetes complications, but their complete molecular mechanism and pathophysiological process still require further study.

2021 impact factor: 7.422

The 60 Second Metabolist

In this section authors briefly report on their work recently published in Molecular Metabolism.

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