Cover Story Current Issue

Cancer cachexia is a systemic metabolic dysfunction that affects more than 80% of pancreatic cancer patients and is the leading cause of death in 22%–30% of all cancers. Because the cancer spread beyond the pancreas at the time of diagnosis, only about 20% of patients are candidates for surgery. Pancreatic cancer's aggressiveness destabilizes whole-body homeostasis by dismantling the normal network of organs crosstalk. This miss-communication favors the tumor progression during cancer cachexia, which is characterized by devastating body weight lossmuscle atrophy, fat wasting, decreased appetite. The molecular mechanisms underlying these metabolic cues are still being investigated.

Mengistu Lemecha, Jaya Prakash Chalise, Yuki Takamuku, Guoxiang Zhang, ... Keiichi Itakura

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Current Issue

Contribution of the co-chaperone FKBP51 in the ventromedial hypothalamus to metabolic homeostasis in male and female mice

Lea M. Brix, Irmak Toksöz, London Aman, Veronika Kovarova, ... Mathias V. Schmidt

Objective

Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) expressing neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) have been directly implicated in whole-body metabolism and in the onset of obesity. The co-chaperone FKBP51 is abundantly expressed in the VMH and was recently linked to type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, adipogenesis, browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) and bodyweight regulation.

Methods

We investigated the role of FKBP51 in the VMH by conditional deletion and virus-mediated overexpression of FKBP51 in SF1-positive neurons. Baseline and high fat diet (HFD)-induced metabolic- and stress-related phenotypes in male and female mice were obtained.

Results

In contrast to previously reported robust phenotypes of FKBP51 manipulation in the entire mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), selective deletion or overexpression of FKBP51 in the VMH resulted in only a moderate alteration of HFD-induced bodyweight gain and body composition, independent of sex.

Conclusions

Overall, this study shows that animals lacking and overexpressing Fkbp5 in Sf1-expressing cells within the VMH display only a mild metabolic phenotype compared to an MBH-wide manipulation of this gene, suggesting that FKBP51 in SF1 neurons within this hypothalamic nucleus plays a subsidiary role in controlling whole-body metabolism.

 

Contribution of the co-chaperone FKBP51 in the ventromedial hypothalamus to metabolic homeostasis in male and female mice

Lea M. Brix, Irmak Toksöz, London Aman, Veronika Kovarova, ... Mathias V. Schmidt

Objective

Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) expressing neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) have been directly implicated in whole-body metabolism and in the onset of obesity. The co-chaperone FKBP51 is abundantly expressed in the VMH and was recently linked to type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, adipogenesis, browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) and bodyweight regulation.

Methods

We investigated the role of FKBP51 in the VMH by conditional deletion and virus-mediated overexpression of FKBP51 in SF1-positive neurons. Baseline and high fat diet (HFD)-induced metabolic- and stress-related phenotypes in male and female mice were obtained.

Results

In contrast to previously reported robust phenotypes of FKBP51 manipulation in the entire mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), selective deletion or overexpression of FKBP51 in the VMH resulted in only a moderate alteration of HFD-induced bodyweight gain and body composition, independent of sex.

Conclusions

Overall, this study shows that animals lacking and overexpressing Fkbp5 in Sf1-expressing cells within the VMH display only a mild metabolic phenotype compared to an MBH-wide manipulation of this gene, suggesting that FKBP51 in SF1 neurons within this hypothalamic nucleus plays a subsidiary role in controlling whole-body metabolism.

 

2021 impact factor: 8.568

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