Cover Story Current Issue

Emerging evidence from both human and animal studies underscores a significant association between obesity and cognitive decline, including brain atrophy, diminished white matter volume, compromised blood–brain barrier integrity, and heightened susceptibility to late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, chronic disruptions in glucose homeostasis, impaired insulin signaling, and metabolic dysfunctions are closely linked to cognitive impairments and the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. These observations suggest the importance of maintaining normal body weight and proper fuel metabolism, which is crucial to reducing the risk of developing cognitive decline and neurodegenerative diseases.

Full text

 

Current Issue

The gut-brain axis mediates bacterial driven modulation of reward signaling

Jiyoung S. Kim, Kevin C. Williams, Rebecca A. Kirkland, Ruth Schade, ... Claire B. de La Serre

The gut-brain axis mediates bacterial driven modulation of reward signaling

Objective

Our goal is to investigate if microbiota composition modulates reward signaling and assess the role of the vagus in mediating microbiota to brain communication.

Methods

Male germ-free Fisher rats were colonized with gastrointestinal contents from chow (low fat (LF) ConvLF) or HF (ConvHF) fed rats.

Results

Following colonization, ConvHF rats consumed significantly more food than ConvLF animals. ConvHF rats displayed lower feeding-induced extracellular DOPAC levels (a metabolite of dopamine) in the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) as well as reduced motivation for HF foods compared to ConvLF rats. Dopamine receptor 2 (DDR2) expression levels in the NAc were also significantly lower in ConvHF animals. Similar deficits were observed in conventionally raised HF fed rats, showing that diet-driven alteration in reward can be initiated via microbiota. Selective gut to brain deafferentation restored DOPAC levels, DRD2 expression, and motivational drive in ConvHF rats.

Conclusions

We concluded from these data that a HF-type microbiota is sufficient to alter appetitive feeding behavior and that bacteria to reward communication is mediated by the vagus nerve.

Articles in Press

The gut-brain axis mediates bacterial driven modulation of reward signaling

Jiyoung S. Kim, Kevin C. Williams, Rebecca A. Kirkland, Ruth Schade, ... Claire B. de La Serre

The gut-brain axis mediates bacterial driven modulation of reward signaling

Objective

Our goal is to investigate if microbiota composition modulates reward signaling and assess the role of the vagus in mediating microbiota to brain communication.

Methods

Male germ-free Fisher rats were colonized with gastrointestinal contents from chow (low fat (LF) ConvLF) or HF (ConvHF) fed rats.

Results

Following colonization, ConvHF rats consumed significantly more food than ConvLF animals. ConvHF rats displayed lower feeding-induced extracellular DOPAC levels (a metabolite of dopamine) in the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) as well as reduced motivation for HF foods compared to ConvLF rats. Dopamine receptor 2 (DDR2) expression levels in the NAc were also significantly lower in ConvHF animals. Similar deficits were observed in conventionally raised HF fed rats, showing that diet-driven alteration in reward can be initiated via microbiota. Selective gut to brain deafferentation restored DOPAC levels, DRD2 expression, and motivational drive in ConvHF rats.

Conclusions

We concluded from these data that a HF-type microbiota is sufficient to alter appetitive feeding behavior and that bacteria to reward communication is mediated by the vagus nerve.

2021 impact factor: 8.568

You are what you eat

Here is a video of Vimeo. When the iframes is activated, a connection to Vimeo is established and, if necessary, cookies from Vimeo are also used. For further information on cookies policy click here.

Auf Werbeinhalte, die vor, während oder nach Videos von WEBSITE-URL eingeblendet werden, hat WEBSITE-URL keinen Einfluss. Wir übernehmen keine Gewähr für diese Inhalte. Weitere Informationen finden Sie hier.